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Italian Breakfast of Champions

13 Apr

This page is a testament of Love to my Mother, Netta.
“May the lamp of all souls shine her light upon us”

Every morning before school, my Grandfather would take me by the hand and walk me to the chicken coop at the back of his garden. His eyes would twinkle as he handed me the freshest egg from a nest. I carried this warm present in my hands very carefully past the grape vines and fig tree to Grandfathers wine cellar.

In the cellar, he opened a bottle of his homemade wine and poured some into a little glass. I handed him my egg to which he broke the shell and let the egg fall into the glass of wine. Then, he instructed me to drink this down quickly. After I drank his elixir, I felt rosy warm glow come to my cheeks.

This was our custom every day. Nobody in the rest of my family even knew we were doing this. To this day, I credit my Abbruzzese Grandfather with helping me on maintaining my health and wellbeing.

I have never heard of anyone with a similar life story until I found this wonderful article which I post here for you today.

Salute’!

Italian Breakfast

Benefits and tradition are in a glass of red wine (and a fresh raw egg)

From: L’Italo Americano

Grandparents knew value of good red wine for everyday celebration.

As we raised our glasses high, Papa’s words sang out over the dining table, “Saluté per chinto Anno,” his deep, rich voice as hardy and pure as the red wine he held in his glass.

“Good luck, for a hundred years,” his dinner guests echoed back.

I remember how Papa’s face beamed with pride at these joyous occasions and how our meal never began until each family member had repeated the traditional dinner toast and sipped from our small glasses of red wine.

Wine was always a part of our family’s holiday meal. I was introduced to its flavor, as well as its medicinal benefits, at an early age. As each family milestone occurred–baptisms, first holy communions, confirmations, birthdays, graduations and marriages–another bottle of Papa’s homemade red wine was uncorked. Bottles were also poured on Sundays, holy days of obligation and all national holidays–there was always cause for celebration in Papa’s house.

Grandma often put the benefits of red wine to good use as a medicinal cure. It was administered in moderation as a remedy for arthritis and to purify the blood, cure anemia, alleviate stomach cramps and prevent infection. During World War II, when cases of trench mouth and whooping cough reached epidemic levels in the U.S., Grandma administered the rich red wine to each grandchild as a preventative mouthwash and gargle. It must have worked because none of us ever contracted either disease. We did, however, develop a profound liking, in later years, for chianti, cabernet sauvignon and merlot.

Grandpa often walked me to the chicken house to get my fresh egg. He then cracked the egg in a glass, poured in his wine and watched happily as I drank my breakfast. Can you imagine a child today going to school with the smell of hearty burgundy on his or her breath? I shudder to think of the consequences.

As a teenager, I recall the looks of astonishment on the faces of my non-Italian friends as they watched Papa fill my dinner glass with wine. To those who objected, Papa would simply say, “Wine is served in church at the communion rail, is it not? And it was served at the Last Supper.” End of discussion.

Papa’s house was a peaceful one and a place where he felt happiest. He eliminated the extraneous and engaged in living a simple and satisfying lifestyle. His home was well-balanced, filled with the practical things he needed and the people he loved. He had his own quiet corner to which he retreated after a robust meal. It was his belief that the soul sighs after eating a large, traditional dinner and that one should spend time in contemplation and reflection. Papa reflected at least an hour after every meal–the sound of his snoring vibrated though the house.

October has always been my favorite time of the year, when the air is brisk and leaves turn a vibrant rainbow of colors. Papa looked forward to this autumn month, too, but for a different reason. October is the traditional time of year for winemaking. It was then that he assembled paraphernalia and ingredients for the making of his hearty burgundy.

Winemakers on the East Coast had to wait for good winemaking grapes like malaga and zinfandel to come in by rail car from California. But this valley’s winemakers, like Papa, were lucky enough to have the plentiful grapes of the Napa and Almaden valleys practically in their back yards. They only had to arrive in their pick-ups to local vineyards to buy boxes of the finest grapes. Some old-timers nurtured their own tiny grape vineyards for the express purpose of making homemade red wine.

Devoted winemakers, like Papa, usually owned their own grape-crushers, while others rented or borrowed one each fall. After the crush was finished, the juice was poured by funnel into the huge oak barrels that had been cured with sulfur smoke.

Here’s where the talent for good winemaking would come in. One mistake and the winemaker’s barrels would be filled with vinegar instead of wine. But, like Papa, most winemakers had inherited their skills from the Old Country and rarely made a bad batch.

My favorite memory of winemaking was how the family gathered together at the ranch house to help Papa make the wine. The hub of activity was usually in Grandma’s kitchen, where the ladies were hard at work making homemade pastas, sausages, raviolis and hot tomato ketchup, in preparation for a grand October feast. The aroma of roasted bell peppers wafted through the air from Grandma’s hot oven every fall, filling our nostrils with their wonderfully pungent smell.

In the fall, the men in the family gathered in the cellar to cure the wine barrels and to help Papa set up his wine press. Some of the men helped Papa haul in the grapes, others set up the grape-crusher and some cured the oak barrels.

As a child, I remember hearing Papa and Nonna speak of the renowned vineyards of Brolio Castle, the baronial estate of the Ricasoli family, an area famed for its chianti. It is said that wine has been made in this region of Italy since 1000 CE. It was this revered standard of chianti that Papa tried his best to clone.

Years ago, Mama and Papa never had to call in a baby-sitter to watch the kids. There was always an older family member available for this chore. One of my favorite of these family baby-sitters was my great-grandpa, Vincenci. When it was his turn to watch the kids, he’d begin by telling us a long, colorful story of his days as a Cavalry soldier in the Italian army. Along with Granddad’s story, we were also treated to a hot wine drink, similar to zabaione. To keep us occupied after supper, grandpa gathered us all around a crackling fireplace, and as he told his story, he handed us each a large cup. In the cup he placed a raw egg and a teaspoon of sugar. We were then instructed to whip the egg until it was very frothy. By the end of great-grandpa’s exciting tale, our eggs were ready for the boiling water and jigger of marsala wine. After drinking down this rich zabaione toddy, we kids–and great-grandpa–were all ready for a good night’s sleep.

Today, America is having a love affair with wine. And authorities tell us that drinking a glass of red wine a day can increase longevity. But Papa and Nonna, who lived well into their 90s, knew of these benefits early on.

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Grokking The Vitality of Life

4 May

Crow Eating Spiritual Intelligence Many gardeners and farmers who grow their own food often have a spiritual connection to their relationship with “food.”

It’s not the religious type of spiritual, but the soulular journey of their lives that is realized. Quality of nourishment, synergy of family relationships, and the self enriching of each and every moment.

This is realized by the special way they prepare and serve their meals. The “spiritual” content is recognized as a wisdom and a nurturing of the sharing. To “Break Bread” takes on a new meaning as the joy and inner warmth is shared. The lost art of “Supper” is now seen with Real Eyes.

More and more people are transforming their homes, from the manicured lawns and large garages into self-reliant eco- habitats. With a renewed inner vision, using their qualitized spiritual love for each other, their lifestyle is now based upon their new wisdom as they design and grow their future.

They become a self-reliant family.

Their homes now encompass small organic gardens, with new areas in their kitchens for wheatgrass, sprouts fresh juices, and vegetables that are freshly picked from the garden.

What makes this old way of living so unique is the addition of inexpensive automatic watering and lightening systems and many wonderful heirloom seed companies. With an automatic system and heirloom seeds, the home habitat soon becomes an enriching, nurturing environment for the whole family.

Our Love is Greens and Growing

Love is Greens and Growing Gifts


A special mindfulness is shared among family members, the feeling of “home” is shared as the veggies are picked, the meals prepared, together, all enjoy the freshness and incredible taste of garden picked delights.is shared interest of self-reliance is often carried over to the family car which is more of a farm vehicle or a pick up truck. The recycling of trash and the proper disposal of harmful chemicals are top priorities.

This shared interest of self-reliance is often carried over to the family car which is more of a farm vehicle or a pick up truck. The recycling of trash and the proper disposal of harmful chemicals are top priorities.

A small fish pond is added to the organic garden area, and home raised fish is added to the meal. especially winderful is the biological water filter which changes the fish waste waters into nutrients for the plants in the garden. A true Organic system. The fish eat bugs all night long, and bacteria change their waste into nutrients for the plants that we eat..YUM! Magic!

Four hens can supply a family with 3 eggs a day, and Chicken manure is added to enrich the soil. THE CHICKENS EAT THE WEEDS and the egg yolks turn rich orange…YUM! more magic!

The endless possibilities of being self-reliant is an amazing spiritual Grokking to experience. We are so indoctrinated in the “supermarket” mentality mind-set and often forget that “Fresh” really means Eating Spiritual Intelligence…Grok?

Prana Vitality

Live Foods Gifts

Live Foods Gifts

Grokking Love: Growing Spiritual Intelligence

Sunflower Sprouts - Growing Spiritual Intelligence
Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food

1. BUY ORGANIC: Buy and / or grow organic produce and ingredients. Fresh, locally grown organic fruits and vegetables carry the strongest charge. They contain more vitamins, minerals and other nutrients than conventionally grown produce.

Buying conventionally grown foods pollutes and weakens the earth and our bodies. The choice to buy only organic food will be clear if we are operating from our prosperity consciousness, our integrity and self-love.

2. USE FRESHLY CUT PRODUCE: After washing and cutting vegetables, vital Ki starts to disperse, and the decomposition of the vegetables is accelerated. Therefore, vegetables should be cut just prior to cooking (or as close as possible). This aspect of “maximum vitality cooking” can be incorporated easily into your cooking routine.

3. PROCESS BY HAND: The use of electrified, motorized machines to clean, cut or process food should be minimized. The electromagnetic field created by motors interferes with the natural flow of Ki along the meridians of grains, beans, fruits and vegetables, giving them a chaotic, disorganized energy. Maintaining this flow of energy along their meridians supports the flow of energy along the meridians in our bodies. This gives us enhanced energy levels and a delicious sense of well-being.

In addition, the long-term use of this equipment can be harmful to the operator who is subjected to a strong electromagnetic field.

4. EAT VARIETY: Variety is the key to a well-balanced meal. Variety in vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, grains, cutting styles, cooking styles, dishes, color, texture, taste, complexity, seasoning, garnishes and presentation are all important considerations. If we repeatedly eat the same things, we run the risk of emphasizing some energies over others and develop a condition of stuck energy in some areas and excess energy in other areas within the body. Variety of food creates dynamic energy that moves in the body from one organ to the other and from one system to the other. It is this free flow of energy which supports health.

5. EAT WHOLE FOODS: Eat foods that are minimally processed. Highly processed, mechanized, pasteurized and homogenized foods contain no or small amounts of Ki. When whole grain is made into a flour, for example, the oils soon oxidize and become rancid; of greater importance is that the flow of Ki within that grain is dispersed and lost. Eating dry cereal or even rolled oats for breakfast is not the best way to start the day, as these are examples of over-processed and devitalized foods. Processing lowers or eliminates a food’s vital nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, trace minerals, enzymes and coenzymes.

6. EAT SEA VEGETABLES: Incorporate sea vegetables into various dishes, and prepare side dishes of sea vegetables like arame, hijiki and sea palm. Sea vegetables are high in minerals and trace minerals, are vital to a healthy metabolism, and keep our nervous and immune systems strong. Even organically grown foods lack important minerals due to soil depletion from over-farming the land. All soils are not created equal, and most are inherently lacking in some minerals like iron, selenium or iodine. Therefore, it is remiss to rely exclusively upon land vegetables to supply one’s need for minerals.

7. EAT FERMENTED FOODS: Most, if not all, traditional cultures of the world incorporate some fermented foods into their diets. For example, the Germans pickle cabbage to make sauerkraut; the Japanese ferment plums to make umeboshi, soy beans to make miso, shoyu, and natto; and many European cultures ferment grapes to make wine and flour to make sourdough bread. Fermented foods maintain the beneficial bacteria in the digestive system. A healthy digestive system is the key to vibrant health; (hence the term “intestinal fortitude”). Beneficial bacteria and their byproducts work with the immune system to protect the body from harmful bacteria.

8. EXCLUDE DAIRY: Eliminate dairy products completely from your diet. The use of dairy in one’s diet can be detrimental to one’s health. This is well documented in Diet for a New America by John Robbins and many other books and studies. High concentrations of pesticides, herbicides, antibiotics and hormones have been found in dairy products.

On an energetic level, eating dairy products keeps us stuck emotionally and psychologically in an infant’s paradigm. When an infant’s teeth start to grow a mother weans her child. It is time for the child to begin deriving nutrients from food by first breaking the food down in its mouth through chewing. This is the child’s first step towards independence.

On a physical level, why drink milk or eat a product made from it when we know milk is inherently for calves and their particular biological needs? I believe dairy products are not foods, and when we eat them we are making a mistake because we are in denial of the foods that made us uniquely human and continue to evolve humanity.

9. SERVE FRESH: To achieve maximum vitality, cooked foods should be served soon after being cooked. Just at the moment a dish is ready, it is at its peak Ki level. Soon this energy starts to disperse and the food starts to decompose. For maximum vitality, leftovers should not be more than 24 hours old. Grain and bean dishes can be reheated but vegetable dishes should not.

10. FINE-TUNE COOKING SKILLS: This includes not overcooking and not over-stirring food (creating a mishmash mush), and the proper use of a gas stove giving consideration to flame height. An understanding of the energetics of food and cooking styles is needed.

Macrobiotic cooking classes and books address these concerns: Macrobiotic Resources and Information

In time, with practice, knowledge and understanding you will achieve maximum vitality through food. Maintain the integrity of our food and our food will maintain the integrity of our bodies. Maintain the integrity of our bodies, and our bodies will maintain the integrity of our spirit.